XOXOGothicGirl
briannathestrange:

A vision of grace, beauty, wisdom and strength of character, Queen Elinor is fiercely dedicated to the well being of her family and kingdom. As the diplomatic counterpoint to her more impulsive husband, King Fergus, Elinor carries the weight of the kingdom on her shoulders.

briannathestrange:

A vision of grace, beauty, wisdom and strength of character, Queen Elinor is fiercely dedicated to the well being of her family and kingdom. As the diplomatic counterpoint to her more impulsive husband, King Fergus, Elinor carries the weight of the kingdom on her shoulders.

candivase:

This post picked up again last week, so I made a sequel

usbdongle:

you ever notice a lot of stuff is considered poor and gross unless its upper middle class (white) people doing it

food trucks in the 90s were the realm of taco trucks and fairground food and were always considered unhygienic and nasty until all these rich city kids started…

peppapigvevo:

In honor of day twos’ SDCC Reveal, Casta Fierce!
I love this doll so much, I can’t wait to get her!

peppapigvevo:

In honor of day twos’ SDCC Reveal, Casta Fierce!

I love this doll so much, I can’t wait to get her!

zenosanalytic:

jopara:

thefemaletyrant:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:


generalbriefing:


So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…


Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.


Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.
The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:  Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).  Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).  Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).  Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).  Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).  Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).  Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).  Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).  Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).  Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).  Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).  You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.
Link 

Thanks!

learning more from tumblr than college
yet again

Another fun little tidbid: look at the name we get Jesus from: Yeshua. Moving from Hebrew to Latin and Greek, the Y became an I, then a J when the “ya” sound shifted to “ja”. Look familiar? That’s right; Jesus’s proper Latinized name isn’t even Jesus, it’s Joshua :)
So why did the back change? Greek and Latin don’t have male names that end in vowel sounds; those are typically reserved for women particularly among the Romans where women were long named after their fathers (i.e. Julia is the feminine version of Julius, so it would be read by a Roman literally as “Julius’s daughter” or “Julius’s girl”. By-and-Large Not a fun time being a lady in Republic and Imperial Roman society). As such, a vowel-ending hardly seemed appropriate for their new man-god and they gave it a male ending, -us. Yeshua becomes Yeshuas, and because end-of-name dipthongs like that are also uncommon in Latin and Greek(this is one reason why ancient scholars assumed the Perseus stories and cult originally came from “The East” btw; the ancient Greeks blamed anything odd about the practices and stories of the common folk as coming from “The East”[mostly because they believed everyone to their North and West to be uncivilized savages with nothing to contribute to Civilization, even though most of the precious metals they used likely came from their North and West] so never let anyone tell you Orientalism is a new thing :p In modern times, classics scholars typically think it means Perseus predates the Indo-European Greek culture), it got taken out too, making Yeshus Iesus, then Jesus when J was invented :)

zenosanalytic:

jopara:

thefemaletyrant:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:

generalbriefing:

So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…

Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.

Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.

The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:

Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).

Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).

Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).

Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).

Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).

Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).

Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).

Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).

Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).

Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).

Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).

You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.

Link 

Thanks!

learning more from tumblr than college

yet again

Another fun little tidbid: look at the name we get Jesus from: Yeshua. Moving from Hebrew to Latin and Greek, the Y became an I, then a J when the “ya” sound shifted to “ja”. Look familiar? That’s right; Jesus’s proper Latinized name isn’t even Jesus, it’s Joshua :)

So why did the back change? Greek and Latin don’t have male names that end in vowel sounds; those are typically reserved for women particularly among the Romans where women were long named after their fathers (i.e. Julia is the feminine version of Julius, so it would be read by a Roman literally as “Julius’s daughter” or “Julius’s girl”. By-and-Large Not a fun time being a lady in Republic and Imperial Roman society). As such, a vowel-ending hardly seemed appropriate for their new man-god and they gave it a male ending, -us. Yeshua becomes Yeshuas, and because end-of-name dipthongs like that are also uncommon in Latin and Greek(this is one reason why ancient scholars assumed the Perseus stories and cult originally came from “The East” btw; the ancient Greeks blamed anything odd about the practices and stories of the common folk as coming from “The East”[mostly because they believed everyone to their North and West to be uncivilized savages with nothing to contribute to Civilization, even though most of the precious metals they used likely came from their North and West] so never let anyone tell you Orientalism is a new thing :p In modern times, classics scholars typically think it means Perseus predates the Indo-European Greek culture), it got taken out too, making Yeshus Iesus, then Jesus when J was invented :)

gothiccharmschool:

Hello, we are your ElderGoths for tonight’s symphony performance of Danny Elfman’s Music from the Films of Tim Burton.

clevergirlhelps:


writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.
» Make sure you want to do this
Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.
» Pre-Pregnancy
Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.
Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

Read More

clevergirlhelps:

writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.

» Make sure you want to do this

Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.
Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.

» Pre-Pregnancy

Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.

Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

Read More